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Showing posts from August, 2019

When Taking a Risk is the Only Way to Be Safe by Guest Blogger Rebekah Bronn

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“Mum, Mum!” six-year-old Michael was bouncing up and down on his chair at the dinner table in excitement. “Max is on the radio!”
His mum, Gwenda Johnson, stared at the little radio that sat on the sideboard. Her mouth hung open in shock, and her fork was suspended in mid-air as a voice announced that her sixteen-year-old son was the first person to climb the three central mountains in the North Island of New Zealand.
Gwenda shook her head, half in disbelief and half in despair. What was she going to do with this son of hers? The natural caution that most people are born with just didn’t seem to be a part of her boy’s DNA. This mountain climbing feat was not the first time Max had taken huge risks and she was sure that it wouldn’t be the last. But what could she do? It was just who he was.
My Greatgrandmother Gwenda had a right to feel worried about some of the downright hair-raising exploits of my eccentric Great Uncle, her son Max. Like the time he barely survived an avalanche at the to…

Starting well; ending well

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The biblical book of Judges ends with this sentence: "In those days there was no king in Israel; everyone did what was right in his own eyes." (21.25) You could read that everyone did the right thing, but that's not the language of the Book. It's actually a description of waywardness, that people were setting up their own morality in direct contradiction to the morality of the Almighty. It certainly sounds like our days.

Michael Youssef wrote this last year, "Life in that society was not so different from life in our own postmodern, post-Christian, anything-goes society. These days, people avoid words like sin or disobedience. They prefer to justify their actions with phrases like, "Everybody does it," or, "The old rules don't apply anymore," or, "Times have changed." It's true that times have changed, and not for the better. But God hasn't changed. He still says to us, "You cannot receive blessings from Me while you…

Has Allianz settled the score?

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Get ready for some serious head shaking.
Allianz is a German-based insurance company with offices worldwide.
During World War II, the company insured Auschwitz for the perpetrators of evil who ran the Holocaust. Yes, you read that right, Allianz insured the Nazis. 
But wait, there's much more.
The company also insured tens of thousands of German Jewish citizens.

In 2014, this article appeared during a golf tournament in South Florida. In it, Randall Lieberman, Staff Writer, quotes a White House number cruncher who says, "I figured out the worth of all the portfolios held by the European insurance companies. In today's value, Allianz's share of the Jewish claims would be about $2.5 billion, yet they've paid out only about $50 million."  Is that accurate? Who can make such claims and what is the company doing about those outstanding claims?  

Similarly in 2013, again as a result of the same golf tournament, this article was published. The life insurance policie…

The Scandal of Silence

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I was asked recently if I had a 'word' for the church where I was going to speak. The pastor didn't use phrases like "prophecy" lightly, but that's what he wanted. I hadn't really prepared for such, but in a heartbeat, God gave me some words for that congregation, and I wonder if what I offered might not be useful for others globally. Thus I share some of those thoughts here.

Three times in the last year Australian Christians have been given a chance to speak. The plebiscite about same-sex marriage, the general national election in which Liberals won convincingly over Labor and the many other lesser parties, and the issue of Israel Folau and his being sacked by Rugby Australia over comments about certain people going to hell.

In each case, and with great fanfare and public notice, individual Christians were asked to speak out. I read it online; I saw it in the newspaper. I overheard it in church after church that individuals were charged to speak out. 

My fr…